Hephaestus

Hephaistos (heh-FAIS-toss) is the blacksmith god, the god of volcanoes and hot fires and smelting metal ore to make iron. People said he lived inside volcanoes, and when they erupted it was because Hephaistos was moving around.
Hephaistos was Hera‘s son, and was not thought of as having had any father. People said that Zeus had thrown him off Mount Olympus down to earth, and he had injured his legs in his fall and couldn’t walk well.

This story shows his connection to the earth in several ways: Hera, Gaia‘s daughter, is an earth goddess, and her son is also earthy. He is thrown from Mount Olympus down to the earth, and he crawls on the earth instead of walking with his head high like a sky god. Of course the god of volcanoes would have to be an earth god and not a sky god, because volcanoes are inside the earth.
In some stories, Hephaistos is married to Aphrodite, but they never seem to get along very well. She likes Ares better.

This information comes from http://greece.mrdonn.org/greekgods/hephaestus.html

Hephaestus was the only Olympian who limped. He was the son of Hera and Zeus. Some say he was born with a limp. Others say Zeus, in a fit of temper, flung him off Mount Olympus when he was just a baby. 

Hephaestus is the god of fire and forge. He made things, like the gods home on Mount Olympus. He married (and was deeply loved) by Aphrodite, the goddess of love and beauty.  

Zeus ordered Hephaestus to create the first woman out of clay. Hephaestus created Pandora

Once up a time, a long time ago, Zeus ordered Hephaestus (Aphrodite’s husband) to make him a daughter. It was the first woman made out of clay. Hephaestus made a beautiful woman and named her Pandora. 

Zeus sent his new daughter, Pandora, down to earth so that she could marry Epimetheus, who was a gentle but lonely man. 

Zeus was not being kind. He was getting even. Epimetheus and Prometheus were brothers. Zeus was mad at one of the brothers, Prometheus, for giving people fire without asking Zeus first.  

Zeus gave Pandora a little box with a big heavy lock on it. He made her promise never to open the box. He gave the key to Pandora’s husband and told him to never open the box. Zeus was sure that Epimetheus’ curiosity would get the better of him, and that either Epimetheus or his brother would open the box. 

Pandora was very curious. She wanted to see what was inside the box, but Epimetheus said no. Better not. “You know your father,” Epimetheus sighed, referring to Zeus. “He’s a tricky one.”

One day, when Epimetheus lay sleeping, Pandora stole the key and opened the box.

Out flew every kind of disease and sickness, hate and envy, and all the bad things that people had never experienced before. Pandora slammed the lid closed, but it was too late. All the bad things were already out of the box. They flew away, out into the world.

Epimetheus woke up at the sound of her sobbing. “I opened the box and all these ugly things flew out,” she cried. “I tried to catch them, but they all got out.” Pandora opened the box to show him how empty it was. But the box was not quite empty. One tiny bug flew quickly out before Pandora could slam the lid shut again.

“Hello, Pandora,” said the bug, hovering just out of reach. “My name is Hope.” With a nod of thanks for being set free, Hope flew out into the world, a world that now held Envy, Crime, Hate, and Disease – and Hope.

 

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